2019 Conference | Geneva

The Europaeum, in association with the Financial Times, invites you to a Conference

‘Europe in the age of Xi and Trump’

21-23 November 2019

The future of Europe is becoming increasingly uncertain. What may once have been a statement, proudly bandied about, is now more of a question: “The future of Europe?” 

The political landscape is changing, with extremist parties becoming the order of the day, on the right as well as on the left. Whilst this creates its own internal difficulties and turmoil, out in the wider community is yet more uncertainty. Trump’s presidency and the increasing prominence of China has given rise to a whole new host of challenges, as Europe seeks to find its footing in a world dominated by these superpowers, and attempts to compete in a game played by very different rules. Member states of the European Union remain separated by protectionist and isolationist notions, exacerbated further by the bilateral relationships that many have with China and the US, prohibiting by their very definition a united Europe. 

A question mark hovers over technology -the divisive Huawei practically splitting Europe. Defense and national security is a hotbed of uncertainty – the US underpinning of NATO has been thrown into question. And in trade, the long process of globalisation with the rules overseen by WTO appears to have descended into a battle between Trump and Xi. 

And so, we come full circle. The future of Europe? Where next? And how? How can the EU position itself internally, and reconnect with its citizensCan we gradually build a new Europe? And how can it position itself externally, in a world dominated by the US and China? 

The Europaeum (comprised of seventeen of the leading universities in Europe), in association with the Financial Times, invites you to join us in Geneva from 21st -24th November 2019 to debate these questions. At this high-level conference, these issues will be discussed  between senior politicians, policy makers, academic specialists and nearly thirty of Europe’s brightest doctoral students (“Europaeum Scholars”), who have been working over the last two years on ways of improving how Europe operates.1 

Speakers and participants already agreed include Lord Chris PattenProfessor José Manuel BarrosoPascal LamySigmar GabrielBaroness Margaret Jay, Borge Brende (President of the World Economic Forum)Professor Maria Joao Rodrigues (President of the Foundation for European Progressive Studies), Peter Frankopan (Professor of Global History, University of Oxford), Professor Sally Mapstone (Vice-Chancellor of St Andrews University) and Ben Hall (European Editor of the Financial Times). 

Oxford Analytica will provide all participants with an up-to-the-minute briefing pack on the issues involved.

Download full programme here

To register, please email Catherine White on europrojects@europaeum.ox.ac.uk

THE EUROPAEUM IN THE MEDIA & ON OTHER WEBSITES

Articles about the Scholars Programme:
The Guardian
Study International
Leiden University
LMU

UPF

Voices from Oxford interviewed Dr Andrew Graham about the Scholars Programme.

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“We need European intellectuals who can give us the whole picture of Europe”

Romano Prodi


“I salute the Europaeum for reuniting scholars for meaningful exchanges, which constitute the web of our European ideas”

Jacques Delors


“My views on the EU and the damage of Brexit are well known. What appeals to me about the Europaeum is that it transcends Brexit by working right across Europe. In particular, the teaching venues of the new Scholars Programme will offer students radically different perspectives: from the UK leaving the EU, to the Netherlands as a full founder member, to the Czech Republic, a relatively new EU entrant, but not in the Eurozone, to Switzerland which occupies a position all of its own.”

Pascal Lamy, former European Commissioner for Trade and Director-General of the WTO


“The Europaeum is more needed today than at any time in the past.”

Senator Vaclav Hampl, Czech Republic