PRESS RELEASE: New Trustees

Baroness (Margaret) Jay of Paddington and Professor Sally Mapstone have joined the Europaeum Board of Trustees

Press Release: embargoed until 12 noon on 5th March 2019

The Europaeum

New Trustees

Baroness (Margaret) Jay of Paddington is a Privy Councillor and a member of the British Labour Party. She was appointed a peer in 1992 and from 1998 to 2001was the Leader of the House of Lords. This included overseeing the major reform of the House of Lords.

In her earlier career she was BBC television producer and presenter. She has a strong interest in health issues, notably as a campaigner on HIV and AIDS. She was a director of the National Aids Trust in 1987 and is also a patron of Help the Aged.

Since 2001, she has continued to play an active role in politics, including chairing the Select Committee on the Constitution. Among numerous non-executive roles she has held include being a Director of BT Group.

Professor Sally Mapstone is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of St Andrews, the second woman in succession to hold this role.  She is a board member of Universities UK, a trustee of UCAS and a member of the advisory board of the Higher Education Policy Institute. She leads on widening access work for Universities Scotland. She is chair of the international advisory board for the University of Helsinki. In 2017 she received the Foreign Policy Association of America medal for services to higher education.  As an academic Sally is a medievalist, with expertise in the area of medieval and Renaissance Scottish literature. She is President of the Saltire Society, which champions Scottish culture.

PRESS RELEASE: New Members

KU Leuven and Freie Universität Berlin have joined the Europaeum network

Press Release: embargoed until 12 noon on 5th March 2019

The Europaeum

New Members

The Europaeum is delighted to announce that KU Leuven and the Freie Universität Berlin are joining the Europaeum with effect from the beginning of 2019.

In the last two years, the Europaeum has also seen the addition of St Andrews University and the University of Luxembourg. In addition, the Catholic University of Portugal has become a full member (the Institute for Political Studies, Lisbon, was formerly an Associate Member).  As a result the Europaeum now consists of an association of sixteen of the leading universities in Europe.

Dr Andrew Graham, Executive Chair of the Europaeum, commented “Our Director, Dr Mayer, has been leading the discussions with these universities. I commend him on his work and we are very pleased indeed to have KU Leuven and Freie Universität Berlin as additional members. Both are outstanding research and teaching universities and they and their faculty and students represent a significant strengthening of the Europaeum. We are looking forward to working with them. The Europaeum was founded when the idea of Europe was in its heyday. However, the current strains and stresses showing across Europe make it even more important today to bring outstanding young people together to learn to work collaboratively and to become the problem solvers for the twenty first century.”

New Members

We are also pleased to announce that we have recently added two new Trustees: Baroness (Margaret) Jay of Paddington, former leader of the House of Lords, and Professor Sally Mapstone, Vice-Chancellor of the University of St Andrews. These fresh appointees maintain the tradition of the Europaeum of being closely connected both with academia and the wider society.

Notes to Editors

The Europaeum

The Europaeum is an association of some of the leading universities in Europe. It was created in 1992 on the initiative of Lord (George) Weidenfeld, Sir Ronald Grierson and Lord (Roy) Jenkins, who was then Chancellor of the University of Oxford and formerly the first President of the European Commission. It promotes extensive academic collaboration across its member universities and brings together, within an educational context, exceptionally talented young people who will help shape the future of Europe. The earliest members were the universities of Oxford, Leiden, and Bologna.

The network has continued to grow ever since: today, its sixteen members include the universities of Paris (Panthéon-Sorbonne), Geneva (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies), Prague (Karlova), Madrid (Complutense), Helsinki, Kraków (Jagiellonian), Barcelona (Pompeu Fabra), Munich (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität), St Andrews in Scotland, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Lisbon (Catholic University of Portugal) and now KU Leuven and Freie University Berlin. The Central European University is currently a ‘Special Member’ for one year in recognition of the threats to academic freedom that it is experiencing.

KU Leuven

KU Leuven is Europe’s most innovative university (Reuters list, 2018). Located in Belgium, it is dedicated to research, education, and service to society. KU Leuven is a founding member of the League of European Research Universities (LERU) and has a strong European and international orientation. The scientists at KU Leuven conduct basic and applied research in a comprehensive range of disciplines. University Hospitals Leuven, a network of research hospitals, provides high-quality healthcare and develops new therapeutic and diagnostic insights with an emphasis on translational research. The university welcomes more than 50,000 students from over 140 countries. The KU Leuven Doctoral Schools train approximately 4,500 PhD students.

Freie Universität Berlin

Founded in the year 1948 in what was then West-Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin (FUB) today is one of the biggest and most renowned research institutions in Germany with more than 32,000 students and 4,000 doctoral students. Its already strong academic reputation and excellence has been further expanded since 2007: within the German Excellence Initiative, FUB was one of the select few institutions awarded for both its research clusters and its strategic concept as the “International Network University”. Freie Universität Berlin has established a global network of liaison offices in seven countries and works intensively with strong academic partners across the globe. With over a third of its doctoral students coming from abroad and more than 600 international visiting scholars per year, Freie Universität is one of the most internationally recognized German research institutions.

Link to KU Leuven Press Release

NEWS: Europaeum Scholars module 5 completed

The group work is now coming more into focus and the Scholars are doing interviews and preparing for exhibitions. We had some fascinating talks about energy poverty, refugees, gang violence, external influences on elections and much more.

UPF announced the Scholars module online (text in English below): https://www.upf.edu/web/guest/inici/-/asset_publisher/1fBlrmbP2HNv/content/id/221270074/maximized#.XFF6jVz7Tct

The Europaeum doctorate program to train new European leaders moves to Pompeu Fabra

The Europaeum doctorate program to train new European leaders moves to Pompeu Fabra

Thirty European PhDs linked to the fields of humanities and social sciences, among which three of the UPF, will be taking part in the fifth module of the Europaeum Scholars Program in Barcelona, ​​which will include seminars, conferences and workshops by experts and a visit to the Parliament.

16.01.2019

First seminars on the campus of the Ciutadella de l’Europaeum Scholars Program

The Ciutadella campus hosts from 16 to 20 January 2019 training activities within the framework of the Europaeum Scholars Program , a doctoral program driven by the Europaeum Association , of which fifteen of prestigious European universities are part of, among which the UPF.

The training activities that will take place in Barcelona, ​​corresponding to the contents of the fifth module of the doctoral program (of the total eight that comprise it, during the period 2018-2020) include seminars, conferences and workshops by various experts,  presentations and debates, as well as a guided tour of the Parliament of Catalonia.

Today, January 16, have begun several seminars with small groups, corresponding to doctoral students linked to the projects “E-Democracy” and “You and EU”; Some seminars that will be combined with plenary sessions, with the presence of all students, that will be active in the next days.

Some thirty doctoral students from the various universities associated to Europaeum are part of the Europaeum Scholars Program , among which students of the UPF doctoral programs Gerard Llorens De Cesaris (History), Cristina Güerri-Fernández (Criminology Law-specialty) and Mladen Grgic (Law).

The formulation of policies in theory and practice; Eurocepticism; political asylum in Europe; Barcelona, ​​city of refugees; work with women affected by criminal gangs; energy poverty and civil society; 21st century democratic challenges; Teaching in the European political environment, or the ethical dilemmas in leadership, are an example of the variety of topics that will be addressed at UPF, all of them related to the cultural, political and social challenges that Europe currently has .

A program of eight modules that wants to train new leaders committed to Europe

The Europaeum doctorate program, which includes four modules per year (from three to five days each) began on January 2, 2018 at the University of Oxford; The following modules were developed in Brussels, the Graduate Institute of Genoa and the University of Leiden. In 2019, following its passage through Barcelona, ​​the three remaining modules will consist of visits to various European institutions, sessions at the Charles University in Prague, to finish in Oxford, with the presentation of projects and the final evaluation.

The participants selected to follow this multidisciplinary program are students who are studying the first or second year of their doctorate in the fields of humanities and social sciences, related to European studies. Over two years, they will work on a project of their own that is of direct relevance to the political, cultural, economic or social spheres of Europe, with special emphasis on the ethical and moral considerations involved in politics.

According to Europaeum, the program wants to create a new generation of leaders, thinkers and researchers , who think for themselves, but not only with themselves, and who have the capacity and desire to improve the future of Europe. It includes an approach in four areas of crucial importance for the future of Europe: identity, inclusion, sustainability and growth and development, broadly speaking.

NEWS: Prague Appeal, October 2018

Prague Appeal from Coimbra Group, Europaeum, LERU, UNICA and Charles University regarding concerns about the European Education, Research and Innovation landscape and EU funding in the current political climate.

As European organisations of universities, we express our concern regarding recent political developments and discussions, potentially leading to a division of the existing European Education, Research and Innovation landscape and its associated EU funding schemes. We want to stress that the European Education and Research Areas can only develop and flourish further by remaining open to cross-border and international cooperation, regardless of the local political situation and constraints. This includes the mobility of students, teachers, researchers, academic staff and their families, as one of the crucial elements of open and excellent European Education and Research Areas.

We call on the EU decision makers to ensure that the future European programmes, Erasmus and Horizon Europe, will continue to allow, and even further develop, Education and Research agreements with non-EU countries. In particular, a ‘Europe First’ approach is genuinely undesirable.

We believe that open European Education and Research Areas are the only solution to address both European and global challenges to the benefit of citizens and democratic societies.

Signed by
Prof. Ludovic Thilly (Chair of Coimbra Group), Prof. Luciano Saso (President UNICA), Dr Hartmut Mayer (Acting Director, The Europaeum), Prof Kurt Deketelaere (Secretary General LERU), Prof Tomas Zima (Rector of Charles University)

On the occasion of the Rectors’ Conference, Charles University, Prague 24-25 October 2018.

IN THE MEDIA: International Rectors’ Conference, Charles University, Prague

24-25 October 2018
Presentations from leading names in academia across Europe. Watch a Video (YouTube) which includes an interview with the Europaeum’s Acting Director Dr Hartmut Mayer

There are three videos from the Rectors’ Conference:

Feature Video (overview) with interviews: https://youtu.be/EpWvwdVTNn4

Two long videos, streaming the main part of the conference:

https://youtu.be/kjq7h2akU9A
https://youtu.be/Hf6utD6bYAU

IN THE MEDIA: ‘Fighting Europe’s Fight’

6 July 2018
LMU covering the Europaeum Scholars Programme

https://www.en.uni-muenchen.de/news/newsarchiv/2018/europaeum.html

“Fighting Europe’s Fights”

München, 06/07/2018

The new Scholars Programme set up by the Europaeum Network was launched in January 2018. PhD students enrolled in the Programme devote their doctoral research to developing effective responses to the challenges now facing the EU.

An anti-Brexit demonstrator waves a half Union and half EU flag outside the Parliament, London on May 1, 2018. (Source:picture-alliance / NurPhoto)

The level of frustration among citizens in the EU’s member States is strikingly high. This growing dissatisfaction is reflected in the increasingly critical and nationalistic positions adopted by governments toward the EU and its institutions in recent years. This rising sense of frustration can be traced to two main sources: (i) an alleged lack of transparency of decision-making at the highest levels of the Union, a complex political system that many people do not understand or profess not to understand; and (ii) a perceived lack of participatory mechanisms that would give citizens a greater say in the shaping of the European policy. The Scholars Programme in the Humanities and Social Sciences recently announced by the Europaeum Network – a consortium of 12 leading European universities – addresses these issues directly. As the chairman of the Network, Dr. Andrew Graham of Balliol College at Oxford University, puts it, the Programme is “fighting Europe’s fights”. For it is designed specifically to stimulate young researchers to come up with ideas for tackling some of the major challenges now confronting the EU.

Strengthening participation
One of the young doctoral researchers who has received a scholarship from the Programme is Felix Biermann, a political scientist at LMU’s Scholl Institute. Together with the other members of his project group, he is seeking ways of enhancing the use of e-governance in the EU’s administration, under the motto ‘Be Your Own Lobbyist’. “Most people do not know that the EU specifically calls upon its citizens to submit their ideas, proposals and views on draft legislation. But this consultation mechanism is primarily used by lobby groups and corporations likely to be affected by new legislation,” says Biermann. “Our aim is to make this platform more attractive and easier to use, so that it is fully accessible to all EU citizens.” This project was initiated after the first module of the Scholars Programme in January in Oxford. Although it is still in its early days, the project group has already identified a number of promising approaches. “We must simplify and clarify the language – without misrepresenting the issues involved and the purpose of the proposed measures – so that normal people can understand the content. It is also important to ensure that people who have set out their views can subsequently discover how their contributions have been received, and whether and how they have been taken into account,” Biermann says. He and his collaborators are confident that, once their own proposals have fully worked out, they will be taken up by the EU.

Responding to Brexit
One obvious reason for the establishment of the new Scholars Programme can be stated in a single word: ‘Brexit’. “The Europaeum Network seeks to foster and strengthen the European idea, because the departure of the UK from the EU will have significant repercussions for the research landscape in Europe,” says Professor Hans van Ess. As Vice-President for International Affairs at LMU, he recognizes that the current state of competition in research in the EU could be put at risk if such a significant contributor as the UK were to leave the Union. “It is vital that British universities can continue to submit proposals to the EU and take an active part in collaborative research. High-quality research is possible only in a climate of competition and interaction.” He therefore welcomes the Europaeum’s Scholars Programme. As he emphasizes, the initiative offers doctoral candidates in the Humanities and the Social Sciences the opportunity to develop their ideas in the context of international networks. – And these networks work very well. “It is quite rare to see so many very gifted people interacting with one another in such a civilized and mutually respectful fashion,” says Tamara Fröhler, a literary scholar who is preparing a doctoral thesis on 19th century drama. In collaboration with colleagues in her own field, and with historians and legal scholars, her goal is to give voice to those “whose opinions seldom find expression in current political debates”. The eight researchers in her project group are engaged in conducting video interviews in their home countries, with the aim of “simply letting people tell us what upsets them about the EU, and what their hopes are for the Union.” An exhibition based on the content of these interviews will be held in Oxford in 2019 and will later be shown throughout the EU.

Tolerating different views
In addition to project work, the 2-year scholarships (each worth £10,000) provide for direct interactions and coaching sessions with representatives of the EU. This gives the Scholars an inside view of the workings and political life of the EU’s administration. Eight of these modules are planned. In the first of these, held in Oxford, participants in the Scholars Programme had the chance to meet and hold discussions with the Deputy Secretary-General of NATO. One important advantage of working in project groups is that they stimulate an awareness of the range of approaches that can be applied to any particular problem, and participants learn to acknowledge the legitimacy of dissent and to tolerate different viewpoints. “This diversity reflects on a small scale how political cooperation within the EU actually works,” says Tamara Fröhler. “We are all federalists, we are all pro-Europe, but we have different cultural backgrounds and have correspondingly diverse opinions on various areas of policy.” Indeed, this multiplicity of opinions is what makes project work so exciting.

Besides the projects on which Biermann and Fröhler are working, there are two others in the Scholars Programme. One is devoted to fleshing out the idea of an annual ‘Non-EU Day’, on which the benefits of the Union are temporarily suspended. The other looks at ‘energy poverty’ in Europe. Franziska Hobmaier, a PhD student at LMU’s Chair of Public and European Law, is involved in the latter, and she outlines the problem as follows. “A surprisingly large number of EU citizens are unable to pay their energy bills, particularly for electricity, home heating and hot water. This applies especially true to vulnerable population groups, who are exposed to significant health risks and in part excluded from participation in public life when their energy supply is cut off,” says Hobmaier,. Together with the other members of her interdisciplinary team, she is trying to develop ways of effectively eliminating energy poverty by instituting coordinated measures at all levels, from that of local government to the national and European levels. The ultimate goal is to close this striking gap between the lived experiences of those directly affected and the stipulations of EU legislation in this area. The project’s proximate aim is to produce a set of policy guidelines that can also be applied to other kinds of problems. What Franziska most appreciates about the Scholars Programme is that it allows her to be become acquainted with a variety of strategies for tackling problems. “One’s own approach is not the only possible approach,” she says. The other thing is that one learns to express one’s ideas in simpler terms, because the terminology used in one’s own discipline is not necessarily comprehensible to someone from a different subject area. Active participation, discussion and dialog – these are, or should be, the hallmarks of a Europe that engages positively with all its citizens.

Europaeum The Europaeum Network was initiated by Oxford University in 1992 as an association of leading European universities. With a focus on the Humanities and Social Sciences, Europaeum provides students and junior researchers with the opportunity to work and learn together, and to develop a commitment to European cooperation by stimulating collaborative research and academic mobility. LMU became a member of the Europaeum Network in 2015.

NEWS: Europaeum Scholars module 3 completed

Geneva | June 2018

Our latest Scholars module took place in beautiful Geneva, where we were looked after extremely well by our colleagues at the Graduate Institute.
The Graduate Institute in Geneva is a key partner in the Programme. With a wide range of international organisations on its doorstep, NGO status, and a deserved reputation for excellence in skills training, it was the natural choice for our third module. During this module the Scholars visited the WTO and UN and heard talks about institutional reform and the SDGs that tied into these visits. This institutional focus was paired with time for group project work, philosophical reflections on the role of academics in policy making, and practical skills sessions on policy report writing, multi-lateral negotiation, and responsible online branding.

Aims of the first module
* To provide key professional skills training and provide opportunities to practice those skills
* To gain a deeper understanding of the UN and WTO
* To make progress on group projects
The Outcomes
* 100% of Scholars rated the module positively. 88% rated it excellent or very good
* 100% of the Scholars rated the skills training sessions positively
* 94% believed that their understanding of international institutions developed
* 94% rated their group discussions positively; 83% believed that they made significant progress on their group projects

NEWS: Europaeum History Seminar | Trinity Term 2018 | Oxford

Before War, After War

Tuesdays 10am | Gerry Martin Room | History Faculty | Oxford

ALL WELCOME

1st week (24th April)
Dr Rowena Archer | When did the Hundred Years War End?

2nd week (1st May)
Dr Tracey Sowerby | War by other Means? Values and Practices in European Diplomacy c1500-c1600

3rd week (8th May)
Professor Peter Frankopan | Europe and the West – Past, Present and Future

4th week (15th May)
no seminar

5th week (22nd May)
Dr Paul Flather | Europe’s World Wars, the British Raj and the Arrival of Indian Independence

6th week (29th May)
Professor Mike Broers | Visions of Empire: Napoleonic Europe when the War is Over

7th week (5th June)
Dr Gabriela Frei | Visions of World Orders after the First World War

NEWS: MA History & Civilisation Students arrived in Oxford

April 2018

We are so glad that all nine MA History & Civilisation graduates arrived in Oxford this week and were greeted by uncharacteristic & glorious sunshine on arrival. They already spent a term in Leiden, and a term in Paris, and they are now here to write their dissertation and attend a weekly seminar, as well as the Spring School. They will be submitting their dissertations at the end of June and their final degree is awarded by Leiden University.

NEWS: Successful Policy-Making Workshop in Brussels

March 2018

We had a really successful Policy-Making workshop in Brussels with lots of interesting discussions and presentations. Our thanks go to all the fantastic speakers, and to our colleagues at the Institute for Political Studies (Lisbon) and Eupportunity (Brussels) for their hard work in organising this and making it a great event!

NEWS: Europaeum Scholars module 2 completed

Brussels | March 2018

The Scholars Programme had a successful second module in Brussels in March. Our programme focused on three themes: defence, migration, and populism. Highlights included talks from Commissioner Carlos Moedas (Research, Science and Innovation) and Dr Antonio Missiroli, Assistant SG for Emerging Security Challenges at NATO. Representatives of CEPS and the European Partnership for Democracy led a panel discussion on migration challenges and we were fortunate to visit the EU Red Cross Office, where we learned about their current work from the head of their migration unit. Insights into populism were provided by Catherine Bearder an anti-Brexit MEP, as well as a panel discussion involving an MEP from a populist political party, a member of the EEAS, and a journalist member of the High-Level Group on fake news. This was complemented by a talk from Professor Luuk van Middelaar about key points he had learned about communicating Europe to Europe from his time as speechwriter to former President Herman von Rompuy. The scholars also spent time developing their group projects. The module culminated in a visit to the European Political Strategy Centre, where the Scholars presented their project ideas and learned about the work of the Commission’s in-house think tank.

NEWS: Europaeum Scholars module 2 completedIN THE MEDIA: Study International about the Europaeum Scholars Programme

12 January 2018

Spurred by Brexit, scholarship programme aims to tackle Europe’s challenges
Study International Staff | January 12, 2018
24
SOCIAL BUZZ
2018 has ushered in the launch of a new, European scholarship, which hopes to set the continent’s brightest minds to its challenges.

The Europaeum Scholars programme aims to “produce a new generation of leaders, thinkers, and researchers who have the capacity and desire to shape the future of Europe.”

The scholarship programme was spearheaded by Europaeum, a consortium of leading European universities whose members include Leiden University in the Netherlands, Germany’s Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona and the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland.

Prestigious UK-based institutions the University of Oxford and University of St Andrews are also members.

“It is multi-disciplinary, multi-university and multi-locational, and designed to engage academic thinking with the cultural, political, and societal challenges facing Europe today,” according to the Europaeum Scholars website.

It kicked off at Oxford on January 2, where scholars met members of British Parliament, the Bulgarian government, the European DG and heard from leading experts on Brexit and Shakespeare.

“Brexit was absolutely part of it but universities in Helsinki and Madrid and Prague and elsewhere face issues that are just as intractable. There’s the rise of the far right in Germany, the disputes in Catalonia, the tension around migration, and high rates of youth unemployment in places like Greece and Portugal,” one of the scholarship’s founders Andrew Graham told The Guardian.

“These are European problems, not just EU or eurozone problems alone. But it was Brexit that made me think it was time for something fresh.”

The 30 selected scholars will work together over the coming two years through lectures, plenary and small group sessions as well as working on collective projects.

The next module will begin in Brussels in March.

NEWS: Successful Start to the Europaeum Scholars Programme

Oxford | January 2018

On 2nd January 2018, the Europaeum launched the first ever Europaeum Scholars Programme, with 30 selected scholars set to work together for the next 2 years through plenary sessions, small group discussions and lectures. This venture is fully funded by the Europaeum and is designed to produce a new generation of leaders, thinkers, and researchers who have the capacity and desire to shape the future of Europe. It is multi-disciplinary, multi-university and multi-locational, and designed to engage academic thinking with the cultural, political, and societal challenges facing Europe today.
Read more about it in the news!
Watch a video of Dr Andrew Graham talking about the programme: Voices from Oxford

The scholars will work together over the next 2 years through plenary sessions, small group discussions, lectures, and group projects. Four themes run throughout the programme: identity, inclusion, growth and development, and sustainability. The foundations were laid during our first module in Oxford, where our scholars met practitioners from the British Parliament, European DG, EEAS, and Bulgarian government, and heard from leading scholars on Brexit, Shakespeare, and the ethics of technology in warfare. They also participated in a workshop on altruistic leadership and heard from leading thinkers on new ways of thinking about sustainability and the importance of empathy. Guiding them through debates on these topics were teaching fellows from Leiden, Oxford, and St Andrews. We are looking forward to our next module in Brussels in March!

IN THE MEDIA: New Scholars Programme | The Guardian

1 January 2018

The Guardian, 1 Jan 2018
writing about the new Europaeum Scholars Programme, and the Europaeum ideology in general:
https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/jan/01/universities-to-work-on-policy-solutions-to-europes-social-malaise?


Universities to work on policy solutions to Europe’s social malaise

Brexit sparks idea for new leadership programme to tackle problems that have revived nationalism and separatism

The University of Oxford will this week become a founding member of a new pan-European network of future leaders aiming to tackle the continent’s problems and “step over” the immediate disruption of Brexit, according to the scheme’s British originator.

Oxford and St Andrews are among 13 elite institutions to have signed up to a scholars programme run by the Europaeum, an association of leading European universities that asks postgraduate researchers to come up with practical solutions to social and political issues such as human trafficking, youth unemployment and regional separatism.

Andrew Graham, a former master of Balliol College, Oxford, said he had the idea for a type of Rhodes scholarship for Europe in the wake of the EU referendum result.

Graham said he found himself “pushing at an open door” when he first proposed the scheme to universities in 2017 and again in his entrepreneurial fundraising efforts to meet the roughly €10,000 cost for each scholar.

“Brexit was absolutely part of it but universities in Helsinki and Madrid and Prague and elsewhere face issues that are just as intractable. There’s the rise of the far right in Germany, the disputes in Catalonia, the tension around migration, and high rates of youth unemployment in places like Greece and Portugal,” Graham said.

“These are European problems, not just EU or eurozone problems alone. But it was Brexit that made me think it was time for something fresh.”

Graham, who worked in Downing Street as an adviser to Harold Wilson, wants the programme to show that universities can act to overcome the issues that provoked Brexit.

“The Brexit result clearly had a lot to do with a fundamental absence of leadership. But it was also about opposition to evidence, and an information barrier among large parts of the public,” he said.

“As academics we have to think: what happened to the values of the Enlightenment and the insights from the scientific revolution? What the hell did we do wrong?”

The 30 hand-picked scholars will take part in the first classes in Oxford in the first week of January, and there will be a further seven modules in 2018 and 2019 in venues such as Leiden, Geneva and Prague. The group includes four graduates from Oxford and three from St Andrews.

The scholars will be expected to divide into working groups and take specific problems to solve over two years. For the pilot programme to be a success, Graham says, its outcomes will have to be meaningful policy initiatives.

“The results of their efforts have got to have value. I don’t necessarily mean monetary value, but value for society. They can be idealistic, but they also have to be pinned into reality – ideally something that could be implemented in one form or another,” Graham said.

“What we want are outcomes that will excite people and be useful, whether to an MP or the European parliament or an NGO or business. It could be all sorts of things, but it has to interest someone and give them a solution that they can bring about.”

The scholars were selected as people who “think for themselves but not just of themselves,” according to the Europaeum’s description. Member universities submitted a shortlist of names of graduates, generally in the first or second year of a doctorate, studying humanities or social sciences.

“Could someone who voted for Brexit join the programme? Absolutely. But not someone who was xenophobic or only a Little Englander,” Graham said.

The Europaeum scheme is the first of a series of efforts by British universities to continue collaboration with their European partners after Brexit.

The University of Warwick is in talks with peers in EU member states to offer joint undergraduate degrees, while the Russell Group of leading research institutions is looking at a creating new student exchanges with Europe if the UK is unable to remain in the Erasmus programme after 2020.

Oxford is also embarking on an innovative partnership with four universities in Berlin, including Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, allowing Oxford researchers to collaborate with German colleagues.

IN THE MEDIA: Interview with Dr Andrew Graham

January 2018
About the Europaeum Scholars Programme
Voice from Oxford

The Executive Chair of the Europaeum, Dr Andrew Graham, has been interviewed about the new Scholars Programme by Professor William James on behalf of Voices from Oxford. To hear what he had to say about the programme – including the inspiration behind it and what it aims to do – please click here.

PRESS RELEASE: 25 Years & New Initiatives

October 2017

Press Release, 2 Oct 2017
Celebrating the 25th Anniversary & Creating New Initiatives


Press Release: embargoed until 12 noon on 2nd October 2017
The Europaeum
Celebrating the 25th Anniversary
Creating New Initiatives
The Europaeum, an association of the leading universities in Europe is celebrating its 25th Anniversary. Recognising what we have achieved, we have been assessing where we are and looking ahead.

At the time of the Europaeum’s foundation, European idealism was at its height. Today, Europe and European idealism are fragmenting and we observe everywhere the rise of a new populist nationalism and the rejection of empirical, liberal, rational, tolerant thought. In short, the ideas of the Enlightenment that emerged primarily from within Europe and which the Europaeum has sought to foster are in retreat. All members of the Europaeum are strongly of the view that, within this new context, we need the Europaeum more than ever. We need more not less international collaboration, more not less drawing together of the disciplines, more not less awareness of ethical and moral standards, and more not less emphasis on universities engaging with the wider society.

To achieve this, all the members of the Europaeum, assisted by generous donations from, amongst others, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, have agreed:

• To create a new two-year Europaeum Scholars Programme, which will be taken alongside an existing doctoral degree, with an emphasis on multi-disciplinary team work, and a focus on policy. It will be open to any doctoral student at a member university whose work engages with European Studies, broadly understood. The programme will commence at Oxford University in January 2018 and continue at Leiden, Geneva and Prague.
• To build an alumni network of Europaeum Scholars committed to interacting with the wider community and across nations and shaping the future of Europe.
• To buttress the Scholars Programme with a substantially enhanced further programme of faculty and student exchanges, aimed especially at engaging the universities with broader society.
• To widen the membership of the Europaeum and so enable the participation of a broader spread of European faculty and students. We have recently added St Andrews University and we are delighted to announce that the University of Luxembourg will be joining us in 2018.

The overall goal is to create a morally aware cadre of young people who have developed the qualities of leadership, learned how to work collaboratively and who are committed to shaping the future of Europe for the better. Investing in the young is what Europe now needs more than ever.

Speaking at Balliol College, Oxford, on 29th September, Lord Patten, Chancellor of Oxford, Chair-elect of the Trustees of the Europaeum, said:
“Does anyone doubt that Europe faces huge difficulties? Does anyone doubt that the future of Europe must lie with the young? Does anyone doubt that the UK will be a better and more stimulating place if it continues to be fully contributing to, and engaging with, the intellectual mainstream of Europe rather than retreating into English Nationalism? My predecessor as Chancellor, Roy Jenkins, was proud to have initiated the Europaeum and I am equally proud to be part of these new initiatives.”

Dr Andrew Graham, former Master of Balliol, Executive Chair of the Europaeum, and Chair of the Academic Council, commented:
“The structure of the new Europaeum Scholarship Programme is a major innovation designed to meet contemporary challenges. Each of the key features of the new programme – its use of teams, its pulling together of the disciplines, its cross-university, cross-country, and cross-cultural mix, its engagement with the governed as well as the governing, and its concern with moral and ethical considerations – make it ready to contribute from the start to the problems currently facing Europe.”

The Europaeum is also delighted to announce the appointment of the former European commissioner for trade and director-general of the WTO, Pascal Lamy, as a Trustee of the Europaeum. Speaking of the new work of the Europaeum, he said:
“My views on the EU and the damage of Brexit are well known. What appeals to me about the Europaeum is that it transcends Brexit by working right across Europe. In particular, the teaching venues of the new programme will offer students radically different perspectives: from the UK leaving the EU, to the Netherlands as a full founder member, to the Czech Republic, a relatively new EU entrant, but not in the Eurozone, to Switzerland which occupies a position all of its own.”
Oxford, October 2017

Notes to Editors
The Europaeum was created in 1992 on the initiative of Lord (George) Weidenfeld, Sir Ronald Grierson and Lord (Roy) Jenkins, who was then Chancellor of the University of Oxford and formerly the first President of the European Commission. It promotes extensive academic collaboration across its member universities and brings together, within an educational context, exceptionally talented young people who will help shape the future of Europe. As from 1 October 2017, it will have a new Chair of the Trustees, Lord Patten; a new Trustee, Pascal Lamy; and a new Director, Dr Hartmut Mayer.

Members
Members of the Europaeum: The universities of Oxford, Leiden, Helsinki, Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne), Prague (Charles), Krakow (Jagiellonian), Geneva (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies), Barcelona (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Madrid (Complutense), Munich (Ludwig-Maximilian) and St Andrews (Scotland). The Institute of Political Studies, Lisbon is an associate member. The Central European University in Budapest has been made a ‘Special Member’ for one year in recognition of the threats to academic freedom that it is currently experiencing. In 2018, the University of Luxembourg will be a full member.

The University of Luxembourg (UL)
UL is a public research university with a student body of some 6,200. Founded as recently as 2003, UL is already ranked 14th of the best 100 young universities founded during the last 50 years (Times Higher Education, THE). THE also found it to be the most international of all European universities.

Trustees
Dr Pierre Keller (retiring Chair); Lord (Christopher) Patten (incoming Chair), José Manuel Barroso (former President of the European Commission), Philippe Burrin (Director of the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva), Dr Erhard Busek (former Vice Chancellor of Austria), Pascal Lamy (former Director of the WTO), Professor Carel Stolker (Rector of the University of Leiden), H.E. Karel Schwarzenberg (former Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic), Professor Ngaire Woods (Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford) and Professor Tomáš Zima (Rector of Charles University, Prague).

Lord Patten of Barnes, CH PC
Chris Patten is Chancellor of the University of Oxford. He was formerly Minister for Overseas Development, Secretary of State for the Environment, Chairman of the Conservative Party, the last Governor of Hong Kong, European Commissioner for External Relations and Governor of the BBC. He is a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

Dr Andrew Graham
Andrew Graham is a political economist, and a former Master and Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, a Trustee of Reprieve and Senior Fellow of the Oxford Internet Institute, which he founded. He was also formerly a Rhodes Trustee and a Director of the Scott Trust (owner of the Guardian and the Observer). He has been the Chair of the Academic Council of the Europaeum for some years and
earlier this year he was appointed Executive Chair of the Europaeum overseeing and leading the new initiatives.

Pascal Lamy
Pascal Lamy is Président Emeritus of the Paris-based, Jacques Delors Institute. He was the Director-General of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) until 1 September 2013 serving for two full four year terms. From 1999 to 2004 he was European Commissioner for Trade. He is a Trustee with Thomson Reuters and is also a member of the Advisory Boards for the Centre for European Reform and a member of the European Council on Foreign Relations. He is a graduate of HEC School of Management, “Science-Po” (The Institute of Political Studies, Paris) and Ecole Nationale d’Administration (ENA) in Paris.

New Director of the Europaeum – Dr Hartmut Mayer
Dr Hartmut Mayer takes up his new post on 1 October, 2017. He is an Official Fellow and Tutor in Politics and International Relations at St. Peter`s College, Oxford, and Adjunct Professor in European and Eurasian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies, Bologna. He studied History, Politics and Drama at the Free University of Berlin before undertaking graduate studies in International Relations at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University), at Harvard University and the University of Cambridge (Gonville and Caius College). He received his doctorate in International Relations from St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford.

Further enquiries should be addressed to Andrew Graham (andrew.graham@balliol.ox.ac.uk)

NEWS: Paul Flather to step back from his role at the Europaeum

September 2017

Paul Flather set to step back from key role

After more than 15 years at the helm of the Europaeum association, having presided over its growth and development, Paul Flather will be stepping back from his key role this autumn.

He has helped pioneer many of its signature programmes and projects – the jointly-offered degree courses, one of which is to win Erasmus Mundus support; the international graduate workshops for advanced research students; the exiting week-long flagship summer schools; and the many academic mobility and exchange schemes, scholarships schemes and bursaries.

“I will miss so many aspects of the work,” Paul Flather says. ”But most of all working with so many lively and smart students from all over the world, not just Europe. The personal thanks, the warm feedback, even the tears and hugs at the end of our events, will be something I will be sure to cherish.”

“All good things must come to an end – and it is a time for a change for me, and, no doubt, for the Europaeum too.  It is now 25 years old now, the right moment to move on”, he adds.

He was first introduced to the Europaeum in the mid 1990s when he served as Director of International and External Affairs at the University of Oxford, when he first got to know Lord (George) Weidenfeld, the founding inspiration for the consortium, and they built up a very deep relationship – which continued after the Europaeum became an independent charity under UK law from 2000 and Paul Flather was appointed as founding Secretary-General after a job competition across all the members.

Paul recalls: “One of my highlights has been regular visits to discuss progress with George either in his office at Weidenfeld and Nicolson, or in his book lined office in Chelsea. He was always so full of energy, so flattering, dubbing me ‘the alchemist who watched over the growth of his first baby’!”

After the Europaeum, Lord Weidenfeld went on to help to initiate many more significant projects and programmes – including the Blavatnik School of Government, the Weidenfeld-Hoffmann scholarships scheme, the Club of Three, and the Institute of Strategic Dialogue.

Dr Flather began his professional life as a journalist, working variously for the BBC, Times Newspapers, the Times of India, and the New Statesman, before returning to Balliol to complete a national prize-winning D Phil (PhD) on Indian democracy, then being elected to run higher and further education at the London Council, before serving as the founding Secretary-General and CEO of the Central European University and various other Soros programmes in Central Europe, and then returning to Oxford to head up a new department. He has been a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, and now of Mansfield College.

The Europaeum began with three founding members, but now has 12 members, and extensive programmes including the Jenkins Scholarships scheme, the Oxford-Geneva and Oxford-Prague Study bursaries, the Brussels policy-making workshop, the International debates in Lisbon, the annual Classics colloquia and various research projects, joint MA programmes, and graduate workshop series, and the publication of journals, pamphlets, edited books and many reports.

Over these 25 years the Europaeum has benefitted some 5,000 graduates and engaged with some 1,000 experts and academics.    

“I have made many friends, been privileged to work on many beautiful university campuses; delighted in working with so many keen graduates. It has been an amazing roller-coaster of a journey.”

“There is a new climate abroad in Europe, forged out of the migration crisis, populist politics, Euro-scepticism, the legacy of the Eurozone crisis, and now Brexit and the arrival of President Trump. This means our agenda has in so many ways, grown. We owe it to George and our other founders to keep the Europaeum afloat.  I will, of course, continue to do my best to support all this.

Dr Flather will step down after the 25th anniversary meetings at the end of September, but will stay involved to direct some special projects and offer guidance for future work. He will focus on two other foundations he has been running in a voluntary capacity, editorial boards he serves on; taking up visiting academic posts, and writing projects. 

PRESS RELEASE: New Appointments

15 June 2017

Press Release, 15 June 2017
New Appointments
https://europaeum.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Press-Release-Thursday-15-June-2017.pdf


Press Release: embargoed until 12 noon on 15th June 2017

The Europaeum

Now in its 25th Anniversary Year, the Europaeum is delighted to announce the following new appointments:

• The Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Lord Patten of Barnes, is to take over as Chair of the Board of Trustees from the retiring chair, Dr Pierre Keller.
• Dr Andrew Graham, former Master of Balliol College, will become Executive Chair, chairing both the Academic Council and the Executive Committee.
• Dr Hartmut Mayer, Fellow of St. Peter’s College, becomes Europaeum Acting Director taking over from Dr Paul Flather, the current Secretary-General. Dr Mayer will combine his position at the Europaeum with that of Director of the European Studies Centre at St. Antony’s College, Oxford.

Lord Patten and Dr Mayer will assume their new roles at the end of September 2017. Dr Graham takes up his position with immediate effect.

Lord Patten comments: “It is difficult to exaggerate the contributions made by both Dr Keller and Dr Flather to the Europaeum. Today, we need the Europaeum more than ever before and I am delighted to take on this new challenge together with Andrew Graham and Hartmut Mayer”.

Notes to Editors
The Europaeum is an association of some of the leading universities in Europe. It was created in 1992 on the initiative of Lord (George) Weidenfeld, Sir Ronald Grierson and Lord (Roy) Jenkins, who was then Chancellor of the University of Oxford and formerly the first President of the European Commission. It promotes extensive academic collaboration across its member universities and brings together, within an educational context, exceptionally talented young people who will help shape the future of Europe.

Members
Members of the Europaeum: The universities of Oxford, Leiden, Helsinki, Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne), Prague (Charles), Krakow (Jagiellonian), Geneva (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies), Barcelona (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Madrid (Complutense), Munich (Ludwig-Maximilian) and St Andrews (Scotland). The Institute of Political Studies, Lisbon is an associate member. The Central European University in Budapest has been invited to become a ‘Special Member’ for one year in recognition of the threats to academic freedom that it is currently experiencing.

Trustees
Dr Pierre Keller (retiring Chair); Lord (Christopher) Patten (incoming Chair), José Manuel Barroso (former President of the European Commission), Philippe Burrin (Director of the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva), Dr Erhard Busek (former Vice Chancellor of Austria), Professor Carel Stolker (Rector of the University of Leiden), Professor Yves Mény (former President of the European University Institute in Florence), H.E. Karel Schwarzenberg (former Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic), and Professor Ngaire Woods (Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford University).
Lord Patten of Barnes, CH PC
Chris Patten is Chancellor of the University of Oxford. He was formerly Minister for Overseas Development, Secretary of State for the Environment, Chairman of the Conservative Party, the last Governor of Hong Kong, European Commissioner for External Relations and Governor of the BBC. He is a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

Dr Graham
Andrew Graham is a political economist, and a former Master and Honorary Fellow of Balliol College. He is a Trustee of Reprieve and Senior Fellow of the Oxford Internet Institute, which he founded. Until recently, he was also a Rhodes Trustee and a Director of the Scott Trust (owner of the Guardian and the Observer).

Dr Mayer
Hartmut Mayer is an Official Fellow and Tutor in Politics and International Relations at St. Peter`s College, Oxford, and Adjunct Professor in European and Eurasian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies, Bologna. He studied History, Politics and Drama at the Free University of Berlin before undertaking graduate studies in International Relations at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University), at Harvard University and the University of Cambridge (Gonville and Caius College). He received his doctorate in International Relations from St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford.

Further enquiries should be addressed to Andrew Graham (andrew.graham@balliol.ox.ac.uk)

THE EUROPAEUM IN THE MEDIA & ON OTHER WEBSITES

Articles about the Scholars Programme:
The Guardian
Study International
Leiden University
LMU

UPF

Voices from Oxford interviewed Dr Andrew Graham about the Scholars Programme.

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“We need European intellectuals who can give us the whole picture of Europe”

Romano Prodi


“I salute the Europaeum for reuniting scholars for meaningful exchanges, which constitute the web of our European ideas”

Jacques Delors


“My views on the EU and the damage of Brexit are well known. What appeals to me about the Europaeum is that it transcends Brexit by working right across Europe. In particular, the teaching venues of the new Scholars Programme will offer students radically different perspectives: from the UK leaving the EU, to the Netherlands as a full founder member, to the Czech Republic, a relatively new EU entrant, but not in the Eurozone, to Switzerland which occupies a position all of its own.”

Pascal Lamy, former European Commissioner for Trade and Director-General of the WTO


“The Europaeum is more needed today than at any time in the past.”

Senator Vaclav Hampl, Czech Republic

The Europaeum is an association of sixteen of Europe’s leading universities. Founded in 1992 by Oxford University, and on the vision of Lord Weidenfeld, the Europaeum brings together talented students and faculty working in the Humanities and the Social Sciences, to promote a better ‘sense of Europe’ through collaboration and academic mobility. We believe that today, we need more not less international collaboration, more not less emphasis on universities engaging with the wider society, and more not less connection between the disciplines. And we believe that fresh cohorts of talented young people, committed to making a difference for the better, are essential to shaping the future of Europe for the better.

For 25 years, we have successfully encouraged collaboration between European research universities, facilitated tripartite dialogue between academics, students, and those working in the public and private sectors, and we have contributed to European-wide debates about culture, politics, and society. We have established excellent faculty collaboration and student exchange; we have earned a reputation for organising strikingly successful student Spring and Summer Schools, public debates, seminars, joint teaching programmes, lectures and workshops; and we run high quality linked scholarship schemes.
Our Europaeum Scholars Programme (launched in 2018) is the latest venture to bring together the values and vision of the Europaeum, with a focus on themes such as inclusion, sustainability, and growth and development.